Published: Sat, March 16, 2019
Tech | By Constance Martin

Render suggests Pixel 4 XL with punch hole and i/d fingerprint scanner

Render suggests Pixel 4 XL with punch hole and i/d fingerprint scanner

Yes, Google has extended the support for the good old smartphone after hearing feedback from many users. There are no visible bezels on the phone and no button of fingerprint scanner, which leads us to believe that there might be an in-display fingerprint scanner.

The first Android Q developer preview is here! The Android Runtime (ART) in Android Q can pre-compile parts of an app to reduce launch times.

We here at AP are chomping at the bit waiting for news on Android Q.

Google hasn't said exactly when Android Q is going to get pushed out to the world at large, but it has said it's going to be sometime in the third quarter of 2019 - so either July, August or September. While some of the latter will undoubtedly be interested in trying Android Q out as quickly as possible, the advice is - as always - to run beta code on a non-essential device, just in case. And when connected to an external monitor, you will be able to use the new desktop mode with your Android phone. It's one of several nice little visual tweaks Google has introduced in Android Q so far.

Sign in to your Google Account to see a list of your eligible devices.

Official support would be welcome news but, if ChromeOS is anything to go by, Google will have an uphill battle to convince developers to update their apps for this mode. It should show up within a few minutes.

This drawing posted on Slash Leaks purportedly shows the Pixel 4 XL with dual rear and front facing cameras.                  SlashLeaks
This drawing posted on Slash Leaks purportedly shows the Pixel 4 XL with dual rear and front facing cameras. SlashLeaks

One thing to keep in mind is that this beta is meant for developers to get an early taste of Android Q and its features and to help them prepare their apps for the public Android Q release.

Android Q, which won't have a name or version number until closer to release, doesn't have any significant visual changes as we saw in Android Pie. To do so, follow the steps mentioned on this page carefully.

You'll then get future beta updates and eventually the stable release automatically as they appear.

The second and more courageous option to try the new Android is manually flashing the Android Q factory images. However, there is nothing to stop an app that has been granted that permission continuing to track users' locations even when it is not in use. Here's the site where you can download them. For instructions on flashing your device manually, head here.

The first renders are 2D images of the front and back of the device.

Along with some neat new features Google is also getting ready for the explosion in foldable phones by including native support for these bendy devices.

Google is reportedly scaling back its laptop and tablet divisions
So it probably shouldn't come as a surprise that Google's dedication would waver in some of its Chrome OS hardware projects. Google's move may be related to feedback it's received for its Pixel Slate and Pixelbook releases.

Like this: