Published: Sun, September 16, 2018
Sci-tech | By Jackie Newman

Water -- not wind -- is the deadliest storm hazard

Water -- not wind -- is the deadliest storm hazard

U.S. Southeast power companies said more than 98,000 homes and businesses in North Carolina, Virginia and SC were without power on Thursday as Hurricane Florence approached the coast.

At the nearby Arthur Christian Church, Booker reports, about twenty people were praying together as the storm barreled toward the Carolinas. Except - and we don't mean to jinx it - but the storm *is* heading further south from here and the wind did die down a bit so who is to say it didn't work entirely?

As of late Thursday, the hurricane center said Florence was 95 kilometers southeast of Wilmington, North Carolina, with top sustained winds of 150 kilometers per hour (90 mph).

Winds and rain were arriving later in SC, and a few people were still walking on the sand at Myrtle Beach while North Carolina was getting pounded.

Officials in New Bern, which dates to the early 18th century, said more than 100 people were rescued from floods and the downtown are was under water by Friday afternoon. "At least 50 shelters are open now across the state".

Near the Sutton Power Plant in Wilmington, coal ash leaked from a Duke Energy landfill.

Florence is expected to slowly move west-southwest through early Saturday. And newly formed Subtropical Storm Joyce is not expected to threaten land soon.

At this time, a large northward drift along the coast is looking much less likely with Florence.

Wilmington resident Julie Terrell was plenty concerned after walking to breakfast past a row of shops fortified with boards, sandbags and hurricane shutters.

"There is going to be a lot of rain".

"The fact is this storm is deadly and we know we are days away from an ending", Cooper said.

Southeastern coastal North Carolina and far northeastern SC are expected to get pelted with 20 to 30 inches of rain, and some isolated spots may get up to 40 inches in 48 hours.

A gauge in the city of 30,000 people showed the Neuse River was recording 9.6 feet of inundation, the National Hurricane Centre (NHC) said.

As Hurricane Florence Makes Landfall, Trump Tweets Support to First Responders
People in areas vulnerable to the unsafe hurricane, particularly those in coastal regions, have fled ahead of the storm. About 9,700 National Guard troops and civilians have been deployed, with high-water vehicles, helicopters and boats.

The remainder of SC and North Carolina into southwest Virginia could see 5 to 10 inches, with some isolated areas seeing 15 inches.

About 800 flights in the region were canceled ahead of the storm, CNN reported.

Forecasters continue to warn of storm surges, excessive rainfall and catastrophic flash flooding.

Washington, DC, Mayor Muriel Bowser and the governors of North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Georgia and Maryland declared states of emergency.

Staff from across all corners of state government, and some federal officials, have been working at the Emergency Operations Center for 24-hours-a day since Monday.

Forecasters also say the storm surge - or wall of water - that the hurricane's winds and forward movement push on shore, could cause normally dry areas to be flooded by up to 4 m of water moving inland.

About 10 million people live in areas that have been under either hurricane or tropical storm warnings and watches.

In addition, the threat of storm surges looms for areas in the path of the storm, meaning life-threatening inundation from rising water moving inland is possible. Charleston felt the impact of three days of record-setting 10-foot storm surges in 2017. That system could develop into a tropical depression by Friday.

Yes, because it's bringing a voluminous amount of rain, and by lingering it creates worse flooding.

Rain was falling on the coast Thursday morning from the clouds on the farthest edges of the hurricane.

The National Oceanic and Atmospherice Administration (NOAA) notes that Florence isn't alone in the "busy" Atlantic Ocean.

By 5 p.m. on Thursday, the Governor and other officials delivered their final briefing before the eye of the storm was set to strike.

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