Published: Fri, September 14, 2018
Sports | By Brett Lawson

Poll Reveals How Nike Customers Have Reacted To Colin Kaepernick

Poll Reveals How Nike Customers Have Reacted To Colin Kaepernick

When Nike launched its latest "Just Do It" campaign last week, centring on National Football League quarterback Colin Kaepernick, some disgruntled Americans published videos of themselves setting fire to the company's products.

A tiny university in Georgia is making big claims.

Kaepernick, who sparked years of debate and earned the ire of President Trump by kneeling during the national anthem, prompted yet more debate last week, as pundits argued the wisdom of Nike aligning its brand with the polarizing former NFL player.

While the announcement of the sponsorship choice did drop Nike's stock earlier last week, a new report said the company's online sales after the announcement grew 31 percent.

The poll comes on the heels of the September 3 release of Nike's 30th anniversary "Just Do It" ad campaign.

These people are outraged because Nike is endorsing someone who they believe disrespected the flag - and thus the country and our military troops - by taking a knee while the national anthem played at NFL games.

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"For Nike to then hire Colin Kaepernick, a person known for wearing pigs on his socks, mocking law enforcement, and kneeling against our flag, mocking our troops, is reprehensible to my family and to the Truett McConnell family", said Caner.

Kaepernick remains a free agent.

Any current Nike gear will still be sold, but all proceeds will be donated to the Wounded Warriors and the Fraternal Order of Police.

A new poll shows that Colin Kaepernick's "Just Do It" ad for Nike hit the brand's target audience, while some consumers' thoughts of the company changed, according to ESPN.

When asked to explain why he chose to return his Nike shoes, Sorbo told CNS News the apparel company "blew it".

Lyon pointed out that the recent campaign, wherein Nike differentiated itself against rivals and took a risk by standing "in support of a social issue", will likely do more good than harm and will strengthen ties with Nike's sponsor athletes. Yes, endorsing Vick was a mistake for Nike, but the company should be commended, not boycotted, for supporting a true American hero like Kaepernick.

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