Published: Thu, September 13, 2018
Sci-tech | By Jackie Newman

Space Station's view of Hurricane Florence looks eerily apocalyptic

Space Station's view of Hurricane Florence looks eerily apocalyptic

According to NASA, this footage of Hurricane Florence was captured by astronaut Ricky Arnold on the the International Space Station at 8:10 am ET on September 10.

On Wednesday, forecasters projected Florence - now a category 4 hurricane - will likely slow down and turn south after slamming the East Coast.

"Get prepared on the East Coast, this is a no-kidding nightmare coming for you", he added. Florence is expected to remain a Category 4 storm when it makes landfall. "It's chilling, even from space", European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst said in a tweet on Wednesday.

"#HurricaneFlorence this morning with Cape Hatteras #NorthCarolina in the foreground", Arnold wrote this morning.

As millions of people in the Carolinas and Virginia prepare for what could be historic damage from Hurricane Florence, people in space are keeping an eye on it from above. For the Carolinas, the NHC predicts a "life-threatening storm surge and rainfall". Winds this morning reached 130 miles per hour (200 km/h) and will likely strengthen before it arrives, officials said.

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An image taken by NASA astronaut Ricky Arnold of Hurricane Florence in the Atlantic Ocean, approaching the Carolinas on September 12, 2018.

Hurricane hunter aircraft also fly through the storm, taking data on wind speed to figure out exactly how intense Florence is at any given moment.

National Aeronautics and space administration (NASA) revealed the extent of hurricane Florence, which is close to the coast of the United States. "It's chilling, even from space", tweeted German astronaut Alexander Gerst, who is aboard the space station.

In addition to the wide shots, some of Gerst's photos are zoomed-in views showing a look nearly directly down into Florence's giant eye.

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