Published: Thu, November 09, 2017
Sci-tech | By Jackie Newman

Facebook trialling system to combat revenge porn

Facebook trialling system to combat revenge porn

If you report an image on Facebook as revenge porn, Facebook moderators will tag the image using photo-matching technology in an attempt to keep it from spreading. They will then tell you to send the nudes to yourself on Facebook, and will let Facebook know you've done this.

Australia is one of four countries taking part in this pilot project, Facebook's head of global security, Antigone Davis told ABC.

Carrie Goldberg, a New York-based lawyer who specializes in sexual privacy, said: "We are delighted that Facebook is helping solve this problem - one faced not only by victims of actual revenge porn but also individuals with worries of imminently becoming victims".

The social media company is right now testing the new strategy in Australia where it is working in collaboration with the office of the e-Safety Commissioner to device methods so that revenge porn can be dealt with.

Grant sought to allay concerns of users about what Facebook would do with the photos they upload.

Facebook is asking its users for nude photos. Why?

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Here in Ireland, Tánaiste Frances Fitzgerald publicised the Government's intentions to criminalise revenge porn in May of this year.

It might sound like an email scam, but the company's piloting the technology in Australia - allowing people who've shared nudes with partners to stop the files being shared when a relationship ends. Facebook claims it won't store images or videos and will only be tracking a digital footprint, known as a hash, to prevent the content from being uploaded again by someone else. "Of course, we always encourage people to be very careful about where they store intimate photos and preferably to not store them online in any form".

Users concerned about intimate images of themselves ending up on Facebook are being invited to send the photos to themselves using Facebook's Messenger app.

"This pilot has the potential to disable the control and power perpetrators hold over victims, particularly in cases of ex-partner retribution and sextortion, and the subsequent harm that could come to them", said Inman Grant.

Grant and Facebook, however, are very confident of Facebook's anti revenge porn tool. "They make you sign on to the service, and then they make you report one of three things".

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