Published: Wed, July 12, 2017
Global Media | By Garry Long

Mosul liberation sounds death knell for U.S. divisive plots: Iran commander

Mosul liberation sounds death knell for U.S. divisive plots: Iran commander

Since October, the CTS, Iran-backed Shia militias, Kurdish peshmerga, Iraq security forces and a US-led worldwide coalition, have fought to dislodge IS from Mosul in what has been described as the biggest urban battle since the Second World War.

Iraq's prime minister Haider al-Abadi addresses forces from a small base on the edge of Mosul's Old City, where heavy clashes have been underway for days, Monday, July 10, 2017.

The retaking of the devastated city after almost nine months of fighting signals the jihadist group's "days in Iraq and Syria are numbered", Trump said in a statement, praising Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi.

Iran's chief Armed Forces spokesman says the liberation of the Iraqi northern city of Mosul from the grip of Daesh Takfiri terrorist group sounded the death knell for the divisive plots hatched by the United States and its regional allies.

Flanked by soldiers, Abadi hailed the retaking of Mosul - from where IS declared its self-styled "caliphate" three years ago - as a historic moment in the battle against the jihadists.

Iraqi forces were earlier today still fighting to eliminate the last pockets of IS resistance in Mosul, with jihadist fighters surrounded in a sliver of territory in Mosul's Old City.

The officials said the coalition will stand side-by-side with the Iraqi government and its people until ISIS is defeated and all Iraqis are liberated and security is restored.

Iraqi forces and the coalition failed to protect civilians, the report said.

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Media caption The BBC reports from Mosul where rescue teams are searching for survivors
Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption The BBC reports from Mosul where rescue teams are searching for survivors

The U.S. -led coalition warned that victory in Mosul did not mark the end of the group's global threat.

The battle for Mosul killed thousands and displaced more than 897,000 people.

USA -backed Iraqi forces launched a massive operation to retake Mosul in October, and in recent days they had confined the remaining militants in an area measuring less than a square kilometer (less than a mile).

Malkit said he was hopeful that all the 39 Indians would be traced in Mosul.However, Parwinder Singh, whose two relatives are in Mosul, is not much hopeful of their safety.

"We will continue to seek the total destruction of ISIS".

"I reject any notion that coalition fires were in any way imprecise, unlawful or excessively targeted civilians". He also demanded that all violations should also be thoroughly probed.

Associated Press writers Susannah George in Irbil, Iraq; Maamoun Youssef in Cairo; Jamey Keaten in Geneva; and Sinan Salaheddin and Muhanad al-Saleh in Baghdad contributed.

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