Published: Sun, June 18, 2017
Markets | By Erika Turner

Divorce bill focus of Brexit talks on Monday

Divorce bill focus of Brexit talks on Monday

"We will go into speak with Sinn Féin again on Monday morning because devolution works and works for everybody in Northern Ireland", she said emphatically.

The Conservatives have 317 MPs while the DUP have 10.

"So I think it is very much doable to have a deal by the end of this month", she concluded.

A DUP spokesperson said there had been a break in tasks due to parliamentary business.

Former Prime Minister John Major said he was concerned May's plan to govern with the support of the DUP could pitch the province back into turmoil by persuading "hard men" on both sides of the divide to return to violence.

"We made the case to her that we would oppose any deal that undermined the Good Friday Agreement", he said.

The DUP and Sinn Fein are taking part in Thursday's talks at Downing Street, along with smaller parties.

Nevertheless, it illustrated the challenge May will face in the remaining days before the European Union divorce talks begin: finding a position that satisfies both pro-European and eurosceptic factions of her party if she wants to remain in power.

British Prime Minister Theresa May's government said yesterday it would launch her policy programme next week, a sign of confidence she will strike a deal to stay in power after days of political uncertainty since losing her majority.

US Fed raises rate, plans to trim portfolio
The benchmark lending rate was lifted by a quarter percentage point to a target range of 1 per cent to 1.25 per cent. Inflation was expected to be at 1.7 percent by the end of this year, down from the 1.9 per cent previously forecast.

Foster said the talks would not cover social issues.

He wouldn't be drawn on whether he supported Britain's continued membership of the single market or the customs union.

"We would restore faith in politics if we could show that this parliament can at least function in presenting a view in the national interest which would command a majority on a cross party basis", said pro-European Conservative lawmaker Ken Clarke.

Prime Minister Theresa May in March formally notified the European Union of its intention to leave, starting a two-year timetable for negotiating the exit.

Britain's Brexit ministry said on Friday that no deal could be struck on exiting unless the future relationship with the bloc was taken into account.

Mr Hammond said: "My clear view, and I believe the view of the majority of people in Britain, is that we should prioritise protecting jobs, protecting economic growth, protecting prosperity as we enter those negotiations and take them forward".

But Mr Davis insisted the United Kingdom still wants to negotiate its future trade relationship with the European Union "alongside" talks on the terms for Brexit, which he said was the process set out in Article 50 of the European Union treaties.

But after a generation of discord over Europe inside her party, May's future could depend on her ability to please both the eurosceptic and pro-European factions in her party.

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